Christian Guilleminault

Publication Details

  • TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN COMMERCIAL LONG-HAUL TRUCK DRIVERS - THE INFLUENCE OF SLEEP-DISORDERED BREATHING AND OBESITY SLEEP Stoohs, R. A., Guilleminault, C., Itoi, A., Dement, W. C. 1994; 17 (7): 619-623

    Abstract:

    This study assesses a possible independent effect of sleep-related breathing disorders on traffic accidents in long-haul commercial truck drivers. The study design included integrated analysis of recordings of sleep-related breathing disorders, self-reported automotive and company-recorded automotive accidents. A cross-sectional population of 90 commercial long-haul truck drivers 20-64 years of age was studied. Main outcome measures included presence or absence, as well as severity, of sleep-disordered breathing and frequency of automotive accidents. Truck drivers identified with sleep-disordered breathing had a two-fold higher accident rate per mile than drivers without sleep-disordered breathing. Accident frequency was not dependent on the severity of the sleep-related breathing disorder. Obese drivers with a body mass > or = 30 kg/m2 also presented a two-fold higher accident rate than nonobese drivers. We conclude that a complaint of excessive daytime sleepiness is related to a significantly higher automotive accident rate in long-haul commercial truck drivers. Sleep-disordered breathing with hypoxemia and obesity are risk factors for automotive accidents.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1994PR32700008

    View details for PubMedID 7846460

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