Sharon Hunt, MD

Publication Details

  • CHARACTERISTICS OF PATIENTS SURVIVING MORE THAN 10 YEARS AFTER CARDIAC TRANSPLANTATION DeCampli, W. M., Luikart, H., Hunt, S., Stinson, E. B. MOSBY-YEAR BOOK INC. 1995: 1103-1115

    Abstract:

    The clinical status and quality of life of 40 patients who lived or are still alive more than 10 years after transplantation at our institution were reviewed with the use of our transplant database, prospective patient examinations, cardiac catheterization, and exercise testing. Patient-perceived health status was determined with use of the Nottingham Health Profile and General Well Being examinations. Factors associated with longevity were determined by a Cox proportional hazards model. Twenty-six patients are alive and 14 have died. The mean age at transplant was 32.4 +/- 12 years and the current age (or age at death) is 46.1 +/- 12.8 years. Actuarial freedom from rejection was similar to that of patients surviving less than 10 years (p = 0.8), but freedom from all types of infection was less (p = 0.005). Immunosuppressive drugs include cyclosporine (11/26 patients), azathioprine (24/26), and prednisone (26/26, mean dose 12.7 mg/day). Catheterization hemodynamic data show well-preserved graft function at a mean follow-up of 11.7 +/- 3.3 years. Graft coronary artery disease prevalence is 51.0% +/- 8%. Exercise test results are as follows: duration 8.7 +/- 3.5 minutes (range 2 to 16 minutes), maximum heart rate/expected rate 77.3% +/- 11% (50% to 92%), maximum systolic blood pressure 171 +/- 23 mm Hg (140 to 208 mm Hg), and metabolic equivalents 9.2 +/- 2.3 units (5.5 to 12.9 units), or about 84% of predicted. Mean score on the General Well Being examination was 75.3 +/- 21.6 (normal). Nottingham Health Profile scores were nearly normal, except for in the 50- to 64-year-old age group in categories of mobility, pain, sleep quality, and energy level. Causes of death were coronary artery disease in 7 of 14, infection in 4 of 14, lymphoma in 1 of 14, and nonlymphoid cancer in 2 of 14. In the Cox regression, variables most associated with survival (t > 2.0, multivariate p = 0.0005) were age at transplantation (t = 3.26), preoperative duration of illness (t = 3.57), postoperative cytomegalovirus infection (t = 2.16), and ejection fraction at 12 months after operation (t = -2.62). We conclude that cardiac transplantation can provide patients with end-stage cardiac failure an acceptable general medical condition, functional status, and perceived quality of life well into the second decade after operation.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995RC74000010

    View details for PubMedID 7776675

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