Ronald Pearl

Publication Details

  • EFFECT OF BLOOD AND ALBUMIN ON PULMONARY-HYPERTENSION AND EDEMA IN PERFUSED RABBIT LUNGS JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY KRAFT, S. A., Fujishima, S., McGuire, G. P., Thompson, J. S., Raffin, T. A., Pearl, R. G. 1995; 78 (2): 499-504

    Abstract:

    Perfusate composition may alter pulmonary hemodynamics and edema formation in perfused lungs. Perfusion for 3 h with Krebs-Henseleit solution with 3% bovine serum albumin did not produce pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary edema (assessed by lung wet-to-dry wt ratio), or increased macromolecular permeability (assessed by 125I-albumin uptake). Addition of blood to hematocrit levels of 10 or 20% resulted in pulmonary hypertension during the final hour of perfusion but not pulmonary edema or increased macromolecular permeability. Pulmonary hypertension during blood perfusion was primarily due to increased precapillary resistance. Perfusion with buffer solution without albumin produced edema and increased macromolecular permeability but not pulmonary hypertension. In lungs perfused with blood (20% hematocrit), thromboxane B2 levels increased in parallel with the pulmonary hypertension, and inhibition of cyclooxygenase or thromboxane synthase with indomethacin or dazmegrel prevented pulmonary hypertension. Perfusion with leukopenic blood (from prior nitrogen mustard administration or from filtration) also prevented pulmonary hypertension. We conclude that blood perfusion produces pulmonary hypertension via thromboxane A2 generation, which depends on leukocyte activation, and that perfusion with buffer solutions without albumin produces edema and increased permeability without pulmonary hypertension.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995QG47700018

    View details for PubMedID 7759418

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