Neville H. Golden M.D.

Publication Details

  • HYPERENDEMIC PENICILLINASE-PRODUCING NEISSERIA-GONORRHOEAE GENITAL INFECTIONS IN AN INNER-CITY POPULATION JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENT HEALTH Seigel, W. M., Golden, N. H., Weinberg, S., SACKER, I. M. 1995; 16 (1): 41-44

    Abstract:

    To determine: 1) the proportion of Neisseria gonorrhoeae caused by penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) in our inner-city population; 2) any difference in the isolation rates of PPNG between adolescents and adults; 3) co-infection rates with Chlamydia trachomatis in this adolescent population; and 4) the appropriateness of current CDC recommendations for initial treatment of patients with suspected gonococcal infection.Genital cultures for GC were obtained from 1990 patients seen in the emergency room or primary care clinics. Of these, 285 were adolescents between 12 and 19 years of age. All adolescent patients were tested for chlamydial infection. Comparisons of gonococcal infection rates were made between adults and adolescents and between males and females. The rates of symptomatic versus asymptomatic adolescents were compared.Genital cultures were positive for GC in 13% of the patients tested. Of these, 51% were identified as being caused by PPNG. Among the adolescents, cultures were positive in 25%, and 63% of these were identified as PPNG. The rate of PPNG was significantly higher in adolescents than in adults. The rate of PPNG was highest in adolescent females and lowest in adult males. There was no difference in the rate of PPNG between adolescents and adult males. Of the 71 adolescents with GC, 58% were coinfected with C. trachomatis. Adolescents with PPNG had a higher rate of concomitant infection with C. trachomatis than those with a penicillin-sensitive strain. Adolescents with N. gonorrhoeae were more likely to be infected with PPNG if they had GU symptoms.Our data supports the most recent CDC recommendations that the initial treatment for suspected N. gonorrhoeae be effective against PPNG. Furthermore, chlamydia screening and treatment is warranted in patients suspected of having an STD.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995QE91700007

    View details for PubMedID 7742335

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