Elliot J. Krane

Publication Details

  • THE PREVALENCE OF PHANTOM SENSATION AND PAIN IN PEDIATRIC AMPUTEES JOURNAL OF PAIN AND SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT Krane, E. J., Heller, L. B. 1995; 10 (1): 21-29

    Abstract:

    Phantom sensations and pain occur with an unknown frequency in children. We hypothesized that such experiences are common among children, and occur more often than is recognized by health-care personnel. Children and adolescents, ages 5-19 years, who had undergone limb amputation in the past 10 years, served as subjects for this retrospective study. Subjects were divided into three major groups depending upon the indication for amputation: congenital deformity (CD), trauma/infection (TI), and cancer (Ca). Surveys assessing phantom sensations and phantom pain were mailed to children and their parents/guardians. The incidence of phantom sensations was 100% in each group, and phantom pain occurred in the overwhelming majority. Both types of phantom phenomena began within days of surgery for almost all patients. Seventy-five percent of children and adolescents who had experienced phantom pain also had preoperative limb pain. At the time of the study, phantom pain had resolved in only 35% of the subjects. Phantom pain was documented in the medical records of only 40% of those answering positively to questions regarding phantom pain on the questionnaire. We conclude that phantom pain occurs commonly in children and adolescents. The association of preoperative pain in the diseased extremity and the later occurrence of phantom pain suggests that preoperative regional anesthesia may prevent phantom pain.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995QL00700006

    View details for PubMedID 7714344

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