Sherry M. Wren

Publication Details

  • A NONLETHAL CONDITIONING APPROACH TO ACHIEVE DURABLE MULTILINEAGE MIXED CHIMERISM AND TOLERANCE ACROSS MAJOR, MINOR, AND HEMATOPOIETIC HISTOCOMPATIBILITY BARRIERS JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY Colson, Y. L., Wren, S. M., Schuchert, M. J., Patrene, K. D., Johnson, P. C., Boggs, S. S., Ildstad, S. T. 1995; 155 (9): 4179-4188

    Abstract:

    Reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with a mixture of syngeneic and allogeneic (A+B-->A) bone marrow results in multilineage mixed allogeneic chimerism, donor-specific transplantation tolerance, superior immunocompetence and resistance to graft-vs-host disease. However, the morbidity and mortality associated with lethal irradiation would be a major limitation to the clinical application of chimerism to induce tolerance for solid organ grafts or treat other nonmalignant hematologic diseases. We report here that durable multilineage mixed allogeneic chimerism and donor-specific transplantation tolerance for skin and primarily vascularized allografts can be achieved across multiple histocompatibility barriers using a nonmyeloablative radiation-based approach. The percentage of B10 mouse recipients that engrafted directly correlated with the degree of disparity between donor and recipient and the dose of total body irradiation administered. Although the occurrence of engraftment following conditioning with doses of total body irradiation of > or = 600 cGy was similar for animals receiving bone marrow disparate at MHC or MHC, minor and hematopoietic (Hh-1) loci (67% vs 78%), the level of donor chimerism was significantly less when multiple histocompatibility barriers were present (94.6 +/- 3.8% vs 37.5 +/- 12.5%). Treatment of the recipient with cyclophosphamide 2 days following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation reduced the dose of radiation sufficient for reliable engraftment to only 500 cGy of total body irradiation, regardless of MHC and Hh-1 disparity. Donor chimerism was stable and present in all lineages, with production of lymphoid (T and B cell), NK, and myeloid (erythrocyte, platelet, granulocyte, and macrophage) cells. Mixed chimeras exhibited donor-specific tolerance in vitro, as assessed by mixed lymphocyte culture (MLR) and cytotoxicity (CML) assays, and in vivo to skin and primarily vascularized cardiac allografts. The observation that engraftment and tolerance can be achieved across multiple histocompatibility barriers using nonmyeloablative recipient conditioning may allow allogeneic bone marrow transplantation to be applied to nonmalignant disease states in which lethal conditioning cannot be justified, including the induction of donor-specific tolerance for solid organ transplantation and the treatment of hemoglobinopathies and enzyme deficiency states.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995TB46800008

    View details for PubMedID 7594573

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