Steven Shafer

Publication Details

  • PROLONGED ALLEVIATION OF TACTILE ALLODYNIA BY INTRAVENOUS LIDOCAINE IN NEUROPATHIC RATS ANESTHESIOLOGY Chaplan, S. R., Bach, F. W., Shafer, S. L., Yaksh, T. L. 1995; 83 (4): 775-785

    Abstract:

    Lidocaine may be useful in the treatment of neuropathic pain states. The authors hypothesized that lidocaine would reduce tactile allodynia observed in a rat nerve injury model. In an effort to determine the site of drug action, effects after intravenous, intrathecal, and regional administration were compared.Rats underwent ligation of the left fifth and sixth lumbar spinal nerves. The 50% thresholds (g) for left hind paw withdrawal of awake rats to von Frey hairs were documented before, during, and after intravenous administration of lidocaine at programmed/documented pseudo-steady-state plasma concentrations, and correlated with measured plasma concentrations. Responses to lidocaine application intrathecally and regionally to the injured nerves were also recorded.In rats with tactile allodynia, intravenous lidocaine yielded 66 +/- 11% of the maximal possible effect on thresholds (100% = normal threshold), versus -1.3 +/- 2.7% for saline infusion. Twenty-one days after lidocaine infusion, 30-40% of the maximal possible effect persisted. Threshold increases depended on plasma concentration, rather than quantity of drug administered: rats receiving 15 mg/kg with higher plasma concentrations (1.2 +/- 0.1 micrograms/ml) showed significant allodynia suppression throughout 7 days of follow-up, whereas rats receiving 15 mg/kg at a slower rate with lower plasma concentrations (0.6 +/- 0.1 microgram/ml) did not. The EC50 for acute allodynia suppression was 0.75 microgram/ml. No such allodynia suppression was seen after intrathecal or regional administration of lidocaine despite transient neural blockade.Intravenous, but not intrathecal or regionally applied, lidocaine produces dose-dependent suppression of allodynia associated with nerve injury. The effects far outlast plasma concentrations of lidocaine. The mechanism of these prolonged effects is unknown.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995RY95500019

    View details for PubMedID 7574057

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