Stuart Goodman

Publication Details

  • INTERMITTENT MICROMOTION AND POLYETHYLENE PARTICLES INHIBIT BONE INGROWTH INTO TITANIUM CHAMBERS IN RABBITS JOURNAL OF APPLIED BIOMATERIALS Goodman, S., Aspenberg, P., Song, Y., Regula, D., Lidgren, L. 1995; 6 (3): 161-165

    Abstract:

    We performed a histomorphological and morphometric analysis of the effects of short daily periods of micromotion and phagocytosable particles of high density polyethylene (PE) on bone ingrowth into a 1 x 1 x 5 mm canal within a titanium chamber in rabbits. The micromotion chamber (MC) was implanted in the tibia of nine mature New Zealand white rabbits. After osseointegration and first harvest of tissue, 40 micromotions (amplitude = 0.5 mm) were applied daily at a rate of 1 Hz for a 3-week period. The tissue within the chamber was then harvested. For the second treatment, PE particles (10(8)/mL) were placed within the canal. The tissue in the chamber was harvested 3 weeks later. The next treatment was a 3-week rest period, in which neither micromotion nor particles were utilized; a harvest followed. The final treatment combined PE particles and micromotion, followed by a harvest 3 weeks later. Sections from control harvests contained extensive trabecular bone arranged longitudinally throughout the canal in a fibrovascular stroma. Micromotion produced longitudinally oriented fibrous tissue within the chamber. PE particles were associated with macrophages, surrounding and engulfing the birefringent particles. The combination of particles and micromotion produced a fibrous stroma laden with macrophages. PE particles and micromotion, alone or together, produced a similar effect in inhibiting bone ingrowth, compared to nonmoved chambers without particles. In this short-term experiment, no additive or potentiating effect of these two stimuli could be demonstrated.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995RP05400002

    View details for PubMedID 7492805

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