Sherry M. Wren

Publication Details

  • INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT OF VISUAL-PERCEPTION BY SURGEONS OBSERVING THE SAME LAPAROSCOPIC ORGANS WITH VARIOUS IMAGING-SYSTEMS Berci, G., Wren, S. M., Stain, S. C., Peters, J., PAZPARTLOW, M. SPRINGER VERLAG. 1995: 967-973

    Abstract:

    Laparoscopic surgery necessitates that operations be performed via a television screen; therefore, image quality is crucial in determining the final outcome. Electronic imaging systems are constantly undergoing revisions and incorporating new ideas. Recently, we have been confronted with a variety of systems, and we, as operators, have no idea what the differences are between the old and the newer systems. As clinicians, we have no electronic yardstick available to compare the options presented or to check the specifications. This study examines critical aspects of image perception. General surgeons, gynecologists, operating-room nurses, as well as allied health personnel all experienced in laparoscopic surgery participated as test subjects. A blinded study was performed in which various camera systems (single chip, three-chip, digitized and nondigitized) were displayed in random fashion. Porcine abdominal areas were displayed using the various imaging units. Participants graded image perception based on the following characteristics: sharpness, color, contrast, and depth of field. The audience were blinded to the types, brand, and number of cameras utilized. A significant preference was shown for digitized systems (P < 0.0001). Also, digitized single-chip cameras scored higher than three-chip cameras (P < 0.05). We propose thorough testing by surgeons and nursing personnel before deciding what type of equipment to purchase.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995RT66600003

    View details for PubMedID 7482214

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