Greer Murphy M.D., Ph.D.

Publication Details

  • LANGUR MONKEY (PRESBYTIS-ENTELLUS) DEVELOPMENT - THE 1ST 3 MONTHS OF LIFE FOLIA PRIMATOLOGICA DOLHINOW, P., Murphy, G. 1982; 39 (3-4): 305-331

    Abstract:

    Observation for the first 3 months of life of 19 Indian langur monkey infants (Presbytis entellus) living in well-established colony social groups revealed complex and related patterns of social development. This is a period of rapidly increasing infant motor ability and increasing infant-initiated independence. Infant transfer, a behavior initiated by others towards the infant and a characteristic of the species, occurs most frequently in weeks 1 and 2, then steadily declines to low frequency in weeks 11 and 12. Infants are not punished or rejected, and to the extent the mother allows, the infant leaves her. She leaves her infant infrequently. The infant widens its radius of activity and increases the kinds and frequency of active interactions it has with others in the group. Patterns of behavior appear to develop in tandem during key periods of early life. Week 1 is the time of greatest dependence with 100% contact at first. During weeks 3 and 4, the infant efficiently expresses itself and can actively prevent transfers. Week 4 sees a constellation of major changes and a rising infant drive for independence. Play increases as do interactions with other immatures. Carrying decreases as the infant is able to follow. Some restraints are observed because of a new set of infant management problems presented to the mother. Throughout the first 3 months of life the mother is the focus of her infant's attention and activities--she is crucial to its survival. The 3-month-old infant is an active strategist with many options of action and choices of behavior and social partners.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1982QA58500008

    View details for PubMedID 7166290

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