Juergen K. Willmann, M.D.

Publication Details

  • Spiral-CT angiography to assess feasibility of endovascular aneurysm repair in patients with ruptured aortoiliac aneurysm VASA-JOURNAL OF VASCULAR DISEASES Willmann, J. K., Lachat, M. L., Von Smekal, A., Turina, M. I., Pfammatter, T. 2001; 30 (4): 271-276

    Abstract:

    To evaluate spiral computed tomography (SCT) angiography for assessment of feasibility of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with ruptured aortoiliac aneurysm (AAA).24 patients (mean age 74 years; range, 69 to 82 years) with suspicion of ruptured AAA and stable hemodynamics were preoperatively examined by using a SCT scanner in the emergency room. SCT angiography was performed from the suprarenal aorta to the femoral bifurcation after a fixed injection delay time of 30 seconds. After that a venous phase SCT scan, beginning at the last image position and ending at the upper thoracic aperture, was performed.The mean acquisition time of the SCT scan was 80 seconds (range 70 to 100 seconds), the mean overall procedure time, including image reconstruction, 5 minutes (range, 4 to 6 minutes). 2D images were directly evaluated during CT data acquisition, and 3D image reconstructions within 10 minutes (range, 8 to 11 minutes) after the SCT scan. AAA rupture was assessed in 14/24 patients (58%): in 10/14 patients (71%) rupture was contained to the retroperitoneum, and in 4/14 patients (29%) intraperitoneal rupture was observed. Successful EVAR was performed in 6/14 patients (43%) with ruptured AAA, and in 8/10 patients (80%) without ruptured AAA. Open surgery was exclusively performed in 6/24 patients (25%) with inappropriate anatomy for EVAR and in 4/24 patients (17%) with intraperitoneal rupture.Spiral computed tomography angiography is a reliable technique to assess feasibility of endovascular aneurysm repair in patients with ruptured aortic aneurysm. However, it can only be recommended for patients with stable hemodynamics, despite of the short acquisition time.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000172626200006

    View details for PubMedID 11771211

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