Jonathan S. Berek

Publication Details

  • SUCCESSFUL IMMUNOTHERAPY WITH INTRAPERITONEAL CORNYEBACTERIUM-PARVUM IN A MURINE OVARIAN-CANCER MODEL IS ASSOCIATED WITH THE RECRUITMENT OF TUMOR-LYTIC NEUTROPHILS INTO THE PERITONEAL-CAVITY JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY Lichtenstein, A. K., Kahle, J., Berek, J., ZIGHELBOIM, J. 1984; 133 (1): 519-526

    Abstract:

    The rejection of a murine ovarian teratocarcinoma (MOT) after i.p. injection of Corynebacterium parvum was investigated. Treatment with C. parvum (1400 micrograms) 24 hr after i.p. inoculation of a lethal number of tumor cells (10(5] induced an antitumor effect that cured 75 to 95% of the mice. Morphologic analysis and an in vivo cytotoxicity assay that measured the rate of disappearance of radioactivity from the peritoneal cavity after injection of 125IUdR-labeled tumor cells indicated that the antitumor effect was initiated during the first 24 hr after C. parvum injection. During this period of time, host effector cells retrieved from the peritoneal cavity prevented tumor growth in a Winn assay and lysed radiolabeled MOT targets in a 4-hr Cr-release assay. After separation of peritoneal inflammatory cells on a Percoll gradient, neutrophil-enriched fractions demonstrated significant in vitro tumor lysis, but neutrophil-depleted populations were ineffective. Microscopic analysis of lysis at the single cell level confirmed that neutrophils were binding to and lysing MOT targets. Further characterization of these tumor cytolytic neutrophils revealed that they are nylon wool-adherent, not generated in indomethacin-pretreated mice (but effectively generated in whole body-irradiated mice), and achieve lysis within 30 min after binding to MOT targets. These results indicate that neutrophils must be considered potential antitumor effectors that can be recruited by treatment with biologic response modifiers.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1984SW96300086

    View details for PubMedID 6373934

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