Paul Yock, MD

Publication Details

  • Efficacy of postdeployment balloon dilatation for current generation stents as assessed by intravascular ultrasound AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Hur, S. H., Kitamura, K., Morino, Y., Honda, Y., Jones, M., Korr, K. S., Reen, B., Cooper, C. J., Niess, G. S., Christie, L., Corey, W., Messenger, J., Yock, P. G., Cummins, F., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2001; 88 (10): 1114-1119

    Abstract:

    Adjunctive balloon dilatation strategy has been shown to improve optimal stent deployment. As improvements in current stent designs evolve, less adjunctive balloon dilatation may be needed. However, few data currently exist to support this practice. We evaluated 88 native coronary lesions treated with single stent implantation (Nir, Tristar or S670). Serial intravascular ultrasound was performed after successful stent deployment and again after adjunctive balloon dilatation. To investigate further the precise expansion characteristics of the stents, serial volumetric intravascular ultrasound analyses were performed in 40 patients with automated pullback. After adjunctive balloon dilatation, minimal stent area increased significantly, from 6.4 +/- 2.1 to 7.4 +/- 2.2 mm(2) (p <0.001). Volumetric analysis showed a corresponding increase in stent volume index (6.6 +/- 1.8 to 7.5 +/- 2.0 mm(3)/mm, p <0.001). In the analysis of cross sections at 0.5-mm axial intervals, the percentage of cross sections, where stent area was > or =80% of the average reference lumen area, increased from 51% to 78% (p <0.001). Similarly, the percentage of cross sections, where stent area was > or =90% of the average reference lumen area, increased from 29% to 56% (p <0.001) with postdilatation. Postdeployment high- pressure balloon dilatation improved minimal stent area and volumetric expansion throughout the stented segment.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000172412300006

    View details for PubMedID 11703954

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