John W. Farquhar, M.D.

Publication Details

  • PERSONAL AND MEDIATED HEALTH COUNSELING FOR SUSTAINED DIETARY REDUCTION OF HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA PREVENTIVE MEDICINE Crouch, M., Sallis, J. F., Farquhar, J. W., Haskell, W. L., ELLSWORTH, N. M., King, A. B., Rogers, T. 1986; 15 (3): 282-291

    Abstract:

    Methods of effective cardiovascular risk reduction that are suitable for use in clinical settings are needed. Several behavioral interventions were designed to be compatible with office-based medical practice, to be delivered by paraprofessional counselors, and to be of low intensity and low cost. Eighty-three hypercholesterolemic volunteers were assigned to one of three experimental conditions (face-to-face counseling, mail and telephone counseling, initial session only). Twenty-six nonrandomized subjects served as a no-contact group and were followed for 1 year. Participants in the first three groups received risk factor education, behavioral recommendations, and a packet of materials, while those in the face-to-face and mail/telephone counseling groups were contacted for five brief follow-up sessions over a 4-month period. At the 1-year follow-up evaluation, subjects in the face-to-face and mail/telephone counseling conditions showed decreases in plasma cholesterol of 6.2 and 4.6%, respectively (P less than 0.01), while the other two groups evidenced small increases. There were no differences by condition for plasma triglycerides, systolic or diastolic blood pressure, or weight. Low-intensity, low-cost behavioral interventions delivered by paraprofessionals can produce long-term decreases in a major cardiovascular risk factor. Physicians are encouraged to incorporate similar interventions into their practices.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986C729700006

    View details for PubMedID 3749008

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