M. Peter Marinkovich

Publication Details

  • BASAL LAMINA INHIBITION SUPPRESSES SYNTHESIS OF CALCIUM-DEPENDENT PROTEINS ASSOCIATED WITH MAMMARY EPITHELIAL-CELL SPREADING EXPERIMENTAL CELL RESEARCH Rocha, V., Hom, Y. K., Marinkovich, M. P. 1986; 165 (2): 450-460

    Abstract:

    Spreading of mouse mammary epithelial cells on collagen gels is closely correlated with the synthesis of a group of putative calcium-binding proteins (CBP) (Braslau et al., Exp cell res 155 (1984) 213). Collagen synthesis was shown to occur during cell spreading, while omission of serum prevented cell spreading and the synthesis of collagen. The proline analogues cis-hydroxyproline and L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid were shown to inhibit epithelial cell spreading and to suppress the collagen synthesis that occurs during serum-supported cell spreading. Inhibition of collagen synthesis resulted in the inhibition of CBP synthesis associated with cell spreading. In contrast, the collagen cross-linking inhibitor B-aminopropionitrile did not inhibit cell spreading nor did it suppress collagen synthesis; CBP synthesis was also normal during treatment with this inhibitor. Thus, mammary epithelial cell spreading on collagen gels and CBP synthesis can both be suppressed by inhibition of collagen synthesis indicating that they may be integrated in some manner. It is suggested that inhibition of cell spreading during inhibition of collagen synthesis results from failure to assemble a normal basal lamina; this may in turn signal suppression of CBP synthesis.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986D238000016

    View details for PubMedID 3720859

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