Richard B. Moss

Publication Details

  • ALTERED ANTIBODY ISOTYPE IN CYSTIC-FIBROSIS - POSSIBLE ROLE IN OPSONIC DEFICIENCY PEDIATRIC RESEARCH Moss, R. B., Hsu, Y. P., Sullivan, M. M., LEWISTON, N. J. 1986; 20 (5): 453-459

    Abstract:

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) whose respiratory tracts are colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) may develop a specific opsonic deficiency for alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of PA. We examined the possible role of altered antibody (Ab) isotype in this phenomenon by measuring serum levels and distribution of IgG and IgG subclass Ab (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) to the major opsonic immunodeterminant, serotype-specific lipopolysaccharide (LPS), by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays employing monoclonal secondary antibodies, and comparing these results to the serum opsonic capacity in an in vitro murine alveolar macrophage phagocytic assay. Twenty-one patients with CF who were colonized with PA had approximately a 30-fold elevation of PA LPS IgG Ab levels and higher IgG subclass 1-4 Ab compared to 10 uncolonized patients with CF and 11 healthy controls (p less than 0.05-0.0005 depending on the isotype). Colonized patients with CF had a shift in PA LPS Ab distribution toward IgG3 compared to uncolonized patients with CF (p less than 0.02). A surprising finding was that uncolonized patients with CF had lower levels (p less than 0.05) and proportion (p less than 0.002) of PA LPS IgG2 Ab than controls, with an apparent shift to higher levels and proportion of PA LPS IgG4 (p less than 0.01). Serum from colonized patients with CF showed diminished opsonic capacity for phagocytosis of PA compared to uncolonized patients and controls (p less than 0.005), with 42% showing inhibitory activity. Functional Ab was also found to be inhibitory at high (greater than 500 ng/ml) concentrations. Serum opsonic capacity appeared to include a noncomplement cofactor for optimal activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986C005200015

    View details for PubMedID 3714355

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