William Clusin, MD

Publication Details

  • MECHANISM OF DEPOLARIZATION IN THE ISCHEMIC DOG HEART - DISCREPANCY BETWEEN T-Q POTENTIALS AND POTASSIUM ACCUMULATION JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-LONDON Blake, K., Clusin, W. T., Franz, M. R., Smith, N. A. 1988; 397: 307-330

    Abstract:

    1. To study the origin of ischaemic myocardial depolarization, the diastolic surface potential - T-Q depression-was correlated with subepicardial extracellular K+ accumulation during serial episodes of widespread ischaemia in open-chest dogs, and in isolated, blood-perfused canine hearts. Placement of the reference electrode on a small island of non-ischaemic myocardium simplified the interpretation of the T-Q potentials. 2. In some experiments, changes in resting potential in the ischaemic zone were recorded using a 'contact' monophasic action potential (MAP) electrode. The change in MAP resting potential was linearly related to T-Q depression for a wide range of experimental conditions (R greater than 0.98). T-Q depression is therefore a linear index of depolarization in superficial myocardial cells. 3. The validity of T-Q depression as a 'measure' of local cellular depolarization was further tested by infiltration of isotonic KCl into the superficial myocardium subjacent to the ischaemic zone electrode. Resulting T-Q depression was 2- to 3-fold larger than the maximum values obtained in ischaemia; and the ratio of T-Q depression to the amplitude of the accompanying monophasic potential was consistent with the assumption that KCl had fully depolarized the underlying myocardium (delta Vm = 89 mV). KCl prevented (i.e. occluded) further changes in the T-Q potential during ischaemia. KCl did not have these effects if it was introduced at sites more remote from the electrode (greater than 4 mm). 4. Ischaemic T-Q depression was drastically accelerated by increasing the heart rate from 90 to 180 beats/min and was further accelerated by arterial infusion of CaCl2. These effects were most striking during the first minute of ischaemia. 5. In contrast, the above manoeuvres produced little acceleration of subepicardial K+ accumulation. After CaCl2 infusion, large ischaemic potentials, severe conduction impairment, and arrhythmias could be observed when K+ activity was almost normal (aK = 4.0-4.5 mM). 6. T-Q depression was larger in vivo than in isolated hearts, both absolutely and relative to K+ accumulation. 7. Based on the reproducible amplitude of ischaemic epicardial potential-estimates of cellular depolarization (delta Vm) could be obtained, which were compared with the concurrent change in K+ electrode potential (delta EK) for each experimental condition. 8. Estimated depolarization was nearly identical to delta EK in isolated hearts under basal conditions. However, depolarization significantly exceeded delta EK during rapid pacing, CaCl2 infusion, or during paced occlusions performed in vivo.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988M128400020

    View details for PubMedID 3411509

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