Richard Bland

Publication Details

  • EFFECT OF HYPOXIA ON LUNG LYMPH-FLOW IN NEWBORN LAMBS WITH LEFT ATRIAL HYPERTENSION AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY Raj, J. U., Hazinski, T. A., Bland, R. D. 1988; 254 (3): H487-H493

    Abstract:

    To determine the effect of left atrial hypertension on the vascular response to hypoxia in the newborn lung, we measured pulmonary artery and left atrial pressures, lung blood flow and lymph flow, and concentrations of protein in lymph and plasma of 13 lambs that spontaneously breathed air for 2-6 h (control period), followed by 8-11% O2 mixed with 3-5% CO2 and N2 for 2-4 h (experimental period). In eight studies, the lambs were made hypoxic first, after which we elevated their left atrial pressure by 10-12 Torr for 2-3 h. In 10 additional studies, we reversed the sequence by raising left atrial pressure first followed by addition of hypoxia. In lambs with normal left atrial pressure, alveolar hypoxia increased both pulmonary blood flow and lymph flow, with an associated reduction in lymph-to-plasma protein ratio (L/P). When left atrial pressure was increased in the presence of hypoxia, lymph flow increased by a small amount and L/P decreased further. In lambs with preexisting left atrial pressure elevation, addition of alveolar hypoxia increased both blood flow and lymph flow with no significant change in L/P. These results suggest that in newborn lambs with normal left atrial pressure, alveolar hypoxia increases lung lymph flow mainly by increasing microvascular filtration pressure, whereas in lambs with elevated left atrial pressure, hypoxia increases lymph flow by another mechanism, perhaps by increasing the perfused surface area for fluid filtration.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988M591900012

    View details for PubMedID 3348427

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