Heidi M. Feldman

Publication Details

  • ACADEMIC-ACHIEVEMENT IN CHILDREN 10 TO 12 YEARS AFTER HEMOPHILUS-INFLUENZAE MENINGITIS PEDIATRICS Feldman, H. M., Michaels, R. H. 1988; 81 (3): 339-344

    Abstract:

    Academic achievement by 23 children 10 to 12 years after treatment of Haemophilus influenzae meningitis was assessed using individually administered standardized tests, review of school transcripts, and parent and teacher questionnaires. The children's performance was compared with (1) their own performance in a previous study 6 to 8 years after the illness; (2) the performance of 23 similarly aged siblings in the previous study, a comparison which served to age match subjects and sibling controls; and (3) the performance of 11 of those similarly aged siblings retested in the current study. Subjects scored in the average range on all measures. Scores were comparable to results 4 years previous in four of six academic measures, with minor deterioration in reading single words and decoding nonsense words. There were no differences between subjects in the current study and control subjects from the previous study, except in decoding nonsense words, and no differences between subjects and control subjects in the current study, except in paragraph reading accuracy. Scholastic grade point averages and scores on parent and teacher behavior problem-rating scales showed no group differences. Subjects used more school-based remedial services, although the trend did not achieve statistical significance. Parents reported spending more time with subjects than with control subjects helping with homework. These findings suggest that children who have recovered from meningitis due to H influenzae can maintain scores and grades comparable to their siblings as they progress to middle school. Their academic success may involve more school and family support to compensate for the mild differences in intelligence quotient and neuropsychologic testing found in the previous study.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988M438800002

    View details for PubMedID 3344177

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