D. Craig Miller, M.D.

Publication Details

  • INCOMPLETE BIOCHEMICAL ADAPTATION OF VEIN GRAFTS TO THE ARTERIAL ENVIRONMENT IN TERMS OF PROSTACYCLIN PRODUCTION JOURNAL OF VASCULAR SURGERY CAHILL, P. D., Brown, B. A., Handen, C. E., Kosek, J. C., Miller, D. C. 1987; 6 (5): 496-503

    Abstract:

    Biochemical (or functional) adaptation of venoarterial grafts has been demonstrated recently. We reexamined one aspect of this biochemical "arterialization" process: prostacyclin (PGI2) production by canine venoarterial autologous grafts and the responsiveness of this biosynthetic pathway to maximal stimulation with substrate enhancement. Four reversed autologous grafts (femoral vein) were interposed into both carotid and femoral arteries in eight dogs. After 12 weeks, the grafts were removed, and radioimmunoassay was used to determine luminal surface production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (the stable metabolite of PGI2) in both the basal and stimulated (27 mumol/L arachidonic acid [AA]) states. PGI2 production by the venous autologous grafts was compared with that of control native artery and vein. We confirmed that PGI2 production (measured in nanograms per milliliter) by control artery was greater than vein under both basal conditions (5.8 +/- 0.4 [+/- SEM] vs. 2.7 +/- 0.5, p less than 0.001) and stimulated conditions (8.8 +/- 0.8 vs. 5.5 +/- 0.4, p = 0.002); moreover, AA stimulation significantly increased PGI2 production in both native artery and vein compared with basal PGI2 production. Under basal conditions, graft PGI2 production (6.3 +/- 1.6 ng/ml) was not significantly different than basal arterial levels (p = 0.8) but was higher than basal venous levels (p = 0.05). However, in marked contrast to both native artery and vein, the vein graft flow surface showed no significant response to substrate enhancement with AA: basal (6.3 +/- 1.6 ng/ml) vs. stimulated (5.9 +/- 0.9 ng/ml) (p = 0.8). These observations confirm that canine venoarterial autologous grafts undergo biochemical "arterialization"; however, this process appears to be an incomplete one.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

    View details for Web of Science ID A1987K859300010

    View details for PubMedID 3312650

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