Fredric Kraemer

Publication Details

  • REGULATION OF MACROPHAGE LIPOPROTEIN-LIPASE SECRETION BY THE SCAVENGER RECEPTOR BIOCHIMICA ET BIOPHYSICA ACTA Murata, Y., Behr, S. R., Kraemer, F. B. 1988; 972 (1): 17-24

    Abstract:

    The effects of ligand binding to the scavenger receptor on the secretion of lipoprotein lipase by murine macrophages were examined. Inflammatory macrophages exposed to acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL) exhibited a dose-dependent, 40-80% increase in lipoprotein lipase secretion. This stimulation appeared to be unrelated to intracellular cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels and to phagocytosis in general. Resident and inflammatory macrophages treated with maleylated bovine serum albumin (Mal-BSA) showed a 3-fold increase in lipoprotein lipase secretion in a dose-dependent and time-dependent fashion. In contrast, dextran sulfate, which is another ligand recognized by the scavenger receptor, caused a dose-dependent decrease in lipoprotein lipase secretion. Casein, a ligand recognized by the Mal-BSA receptor, did not affect lipoprotein lipase secretion nor the ability of Mal-BSA to stimulate the enzyme, while dextran sulfate abolished the stimulatory effects of Mal-BSA. Since ethylamine, an inhibitor of receptor-mediated endocytosis, attenuated the increase in lipoprotein lipase secretion induced by AcLDL and Mal-BSA, but did not affect the inhibition induced by dextran sulfate, it is suggested that receptor-mediated endocytosis of ligands via the scavenger receptor might play a key role in the stimulation of lipoprotein lipase secretion in macrophages. This study reveals another mechanism for regulation of macrophage lipoprotein lipase secretion.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988Q834800003

    View details for PubMedID 3179335

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