C. Barr Taylor

Publication Details

  • PERCEIVED SELF-EFFICACY IN COPING WITH COGNITIVE STRESSORS AND OPIOID ACTIVATION JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Bandura, A., Cioffi, D., Taylor, C. B., Brouillard, M. E. 1988; 55 (3): 479-488

    Abstract:

    This experiment tested the hypothesis that perceived self-inefficacy in exercising control over cognitive stressors activates endogenous opioid systems. Subjects performed mathematical operations under conditions in which they could exercise full control over the cognitive task demands or in which the cognitive demands strained or exceeded their cognitive capabilities. Subjects with induced high perceived self-efficacy exhibited little stress, whereas those with induced low perceived self-efficacy experienced a high level of stress and autonomic arousal. Subjects were then administered either an inert saline solution or naloxone, an opiate antagonist that blocks the analgesic effects of endogenous opiates, whereupon their level of pain tolerance was measured. The self-efficacious nonstressed subjects gave no evidence of opioid activation. The self-inefficacious stressed subjects were able to withstand increasing amounts of pain stimulation under saline conditions. However, when endogenous opioid mechanisms that control pain were blocked by naloxone, the subjects were unable to bear much pain stimulation. This pattern of changes suggests that the stress-induced analgesia found under the saline condition was mediated by endogenous opioid mechanisms and counteracted by the opiate antagonist.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988P923300012

    View details for PubMedID 3171918

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