Robert K. Jackler, MD

Publication Details

  • COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY AND MAGNETIC-RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE INNER-EAR OTOLARYNGOLOGY-HEAD AND NECK SURGERY Jackler, R. K., Dillon, W. P. 1988; 99 (5): 494-504

    Abstract:

    The majority of temporal bone radiographic studies are obtained either for middle ear and mastoid disease or in the evaluation of retrocochlear pathology. With recent technologic advances, diagnostic imaging of the inner ear has developed an increasing role in the evaluation and management of diseases that affect the cochlea, semicircular canals, and the vestibular and cochlear aqueducts. High-resolution computed tomography (CT) provides excellent detail of the osseous labyrinth, whereas magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) generates images derived from the membranous labyrinth and its associated neural elements. Optimal techniques for obtaining high quality CT and MRI images of the normal and diseased inner ear are presented. CT has proved useful in the evaluation of inner ear malformations, cochlear otosclerosis, labyrinthine fistulization from cholesteatoma, translabyrinthine fractures, otic capsule osteodystrophies, in the assessment of cochlear patency before cochlear implantation, and in the localization of prosthetic devices such as stapes wires and cochlear implants. While MRI produces discernible images of the soft tissue and fluid components of the inner ear, it has yet to demonstrate any unique advantages in the evaluation of inner ear disease. However, MRI produces excellent and highly useful images of the audiovestibular and facial nerves, cerebellopontine angle, and brain.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988Q961800008

    View details for PubMedID 3147443

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