Sharon Hunt, MD

Publication Details

  • RETRANSPLANTATION FOR SEVERE ACCELERATED CORONARY-ARTERY DISEASE IN HEART-TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Shao, Z. G., Schroeder, J. S., Hunt, S., Stinson, E. B. 1988; 62 (13): 876-881

    Abstract:

    Development of accelerated coronary artery disease (CAD) in the cardiac allograft is one of the major causes of late graft failure in heart transplant recipients. At the Stanford University Medical Center 356 heart transplant procedures were performed in 329 patients by the end of January 1985. Eighty-nine of these patients developed evidence of transplant CAD. Twenty retransplant procedures, including 2 third transplants, were performed in 19 of the 89 patients because of transplant CAD. The graft survival rates after the second transplant were 55%, 25% and 10% after 1, 2 and 5 years, respectively. Nine of these retransplant patients currently survive, the longest for 5.5 years. To examine potential risk factors for development of severe transplant CAD, these 20 retransplant procedures were compared with 113 transplant recipients who had no evidence of transplant CAD on annual coronary arteriograms. An excess of rejection episodes (3 +/- 2 vs 2 +/- 1 episodes/patient, p = 0.02), elevated total cholesterol (266 +/- 78 vs 225 +/- 47 mg/dl, p = 0.002) and higher low-density lipoprotein levels (176 +/- 88 vs 137 +/- 46 mg/dl, p = 0.009) were noted in the transplant CAD retransplant group. Five of 11 retransplant recipients who survived greater than 1 year again developed transplant CAD. Characteristic morphologic features and rapid progression of CAD in the second graft were similar to those in the primary graft.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988Q603600006

    View details for PubMedID 3052011

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: