Lawrence Shuer

Publication Details

  • HYPERGLYCEMIA DECREASES ACUTE NEURONAL ISCHEMIC CHANGES AFTER MIDDLE CEREBRAL-ARTERY OCCLUSION IN CATS STROKE ZASSLOW, M. A., Pearl, R. G., Shuer, L. M., Steinberg, G. K., LIEBERSON, R. E., Larson, C. P. 1989; 20 (4): 519-523

    Abstract:

    Hyperglycemia has been reported to worsen the tolerance of the brain to ischemia, and it has therefore been recommended that patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures not receive glucose-containing solutions. However, whereas most animal studies have used global ischemia models, most neurosurgical procedures are associated with risks of focal rather than global ischemia. We therefore studied the effects of glucose administration in an animal model of focal cerebral ischemia. We anesthetized 20 cats with halothane (0.85% end tidal in oxygen), and a focal cerebral ischemic lesion was produced by clip ligation of the left middle cerebral artery using a transorbital approach. Hyperglycemia (10 cats, mean +/- SEM plasma glucose concentration 561 +/- 36 mg/dl) was established before ligation by infusion of 50% glucose in 0.45% saline; the control group (10 cats, mean +/- SEM plasma glucose concentration 209 +/- 28 mg/dl) received 0.45% saline only. Total fluid administered, mean arterial blood pressure, body temperature, and arterial blood gas values did not differ between the two groups 0, 2, and 6 hours after ligation. The cats were killed 6 hours after ligation, and the area of severe ischemic neuronal damage was determined by microscopic examination of a coronal section at the level of the optic chiasm. The mean +/- SEM area of left cortical severe ischemic neuronal damage was 12 +/- 2% of the left cortex in the hyperglycemic group compared with 28 +/- 5% in the control group (p less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989U149900014

    View details for PubMedID 2929029

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