Gary Schoolnik

Publication Details

  • INTESTINAL RECEPTOR FOR HEAT-STABLE ENTEROTOXIN OF ESCHERICHIA-COLI IS TIGHTLY COUPLED TO A NOVEL FORM OF PARTICULATE GUANYLATE-CYCLASE INFECTION AND IMMUNITY Waldman, S. A., Kuno, T., Kamisaki, Y., Chang, L. Y., Gariepy, J., OHANLEY, P., SCHOOLNIK, G., Murad, F. 1986; 51 (1): 320-326

    Abstract:

    A novel form of particulate guanylate cyclase tightly coupled by cytoskeletal components to receptors for heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) produced by Escherichia coli can be found in membranes from rat intestinal mucosa. Intestinal particulate guanylate cyclase was resistant to solubilization with detergent alone, with only 30% of the total enzyme activity being extracted with Lubrol-PX. Under similar conditions, 70% of this enzyme was solubilized from rat lung membranes. The addition of high concentrations of sodium chloride to the extraction buffer resulted in greater solubilization of particulate guanylate cyclase from intestinal membranes. Although extraction of intestinal membranes with detergent and salt resulted in greater solubilization of guanylate cyclase, a small fraction of the enzyme activity remained associated with the particulate fraction. This activity was completely resistant to solubilization with a variety of detergents and chaotropes. Particulate guanylate cyclase and the ST receptor solubilized by detergent retained their abilities to produce cyclic GMP and bind ST, respectively. However, ST failed to activate particulate guanylate cyclase in detergent extracts. In contrast, guanylate cyclase resistant to solubilization remained functional and coupled to the ST receptor since enzyme activation by ST was unaffected by various extraction procedures. The possibility that the ST receptor and particulate guanylate cyclase were the same molecule was explored. ST binding and cyclic GMP production were separated by affinity chromatography on GTP-agarose. Similarly, guanylate cyclase migrated as a 300,000-dalton protein, while the ST receptor migrated as a 240,000-dalton protein on gel filtration chromatography. Also, thiol-reactive agents such as cystamine and N-ethylmaleimide inhibited guanylate cyclase activation by ST, with no effect on receptor binding of ST. These data suggest that guanylate cyclase and the ST receptor are independent proteins coupled by cytoskeletal components in membranes of intestinal mucosa.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986AXB5200050

    View details for PubMedID 2867046

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