W. David Ogden, MD

Publication Details

  • CYTOPROTECTIVE EFFECT OF PENTAGASTRIN AND EPIDERMAL GROWTH-FACTOR ON STRESS-ULCER FORMATION - POSSIBLE ROLE OF SOMATOSTATIN ANNALS OF SURGERY Sakamoto, T., SWIERCZEK, J. S., OGDEN, W. D., THOMPSON, J. C. 1985; 201 (3): 290-295

    Abstract:

    This study was designed to test the effects of pentagastrin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) on stress-induced ulceration and on the antral content of gastrin and somatostatin (SLI) in rats. Four groups of 14 to 15 rats had been prepared for 7 days by one of the following methods: saline injection (control); injection of pentagastrin (250 micrograms/kg, 3 times/day); injection of EGF (10 micrograms/kg, 3 times/day); or injection of EGF plus pentagastrin. At the end of the treatment period, half of each group of rats were sacrificed (nonstress group). There were no ulcers in the nonstress control groups of rats. Stress was applied by water immersion in the remaining half of the rats. The injections of pentagastrin and/or EGF resulted in substantial increase in antral content of SLI. After 20 hours of stress, the ulcer index was 40.5 +/- 3.3 in the controls, compared to 6.4 +/- 1.2 and 16.2 +/- 2.3 in rats that received pentagastrin or EGF, respectively. Injections of both pentagastrin and EGF resulted in an ulcer index of 26.2 +/- 2.0, which was significantly lower than that in controls, but higher than that in rats treated with either peptide alone. The stress resulted in significant decrease in antral SLI in all groups of rats, whereas SLI content in rats treated with pentagastrin and/or EGF remained significantly higher than that of controls. Antral content of gastrin did not differ significantly in the four groups tested. The ulcer index was inversely correlated with antral SLI content. We confirm and extend previous observations that pentagastrin and EGF prevent stress ulcer formation, and suggest that endogenous SLI may account, at least in part, for their antiulcer activity.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1985ACZ3800005

    View details for PubMedID 2858183

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: