Sharon Hunt, MD

Publication Details

  • A HEMODYNAMIC AND DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC STUDY OF VENTRICULAR-FUNCTION IN LONG-TERM CARDIAC ALLOGRAFT RECIPIENTS - ETIOLOGY AND PROGNOSIS OF RESTRICTIVE-CONSTRICTIVE PHYSIOLOGY CIRCULATION Valantine, H. A., Appleton, C. P., Hatle, L. K., Hunt, S. A., Billingham, M. E., Shumway, N. E., Stinson, E. B., Popp, R. L. 1989; 79 (1): 66-75

    Abstract:

    Conventional hemodynamic measurements and Doppler echocardiography were used to assess ventricular physiology of the human cardiac allograft and to examine the influence of pertinent clinical factors on chronic myocardial performance. Sixty-four patients (18-55 years old; mean, 39 years) undergoing routine annual hemodynamic assessment were studied. Blood-flow velocity properties across the mitral, tricuspid, and aortic valves were analyzed from Doppler ultrasound recordings. Ten of these patients had elevated diastolic pressures associated with a sharp early diastolic dip followed by an exaggerated and abrupt rise in pressure, consistent with restrictive-constrictive ventricular physiology. Left ventricular dP/dt and stroke volume were lower in these patients compared with the other 54 patients. Doppler echocardiographic indexes of left ventricular filling and ejection in these 10 patients differed significantly. Isovolumic relaxation time and pressure half-time were shorter, peak early mitral and tricuspid flow velocities were higher, and mean aortic flow velocity and acceleration were lower. A higher rejection incidence was the only demonstrable clinical factor associated with impaired ventricular function. Doppler echocardiography may, therefore, noninvasively identify patients with hemodynamic evidence of restrictive-constrictive physiology. This abnormality occurs in approximately 15% of allograft recipients, is associated with impaired systolic performance, and may be related to rejection incidence.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989R718300009

    View details for PubMedID 2642757

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