Ingela Schnittger, MD

Publication Details

  • ULTRASONIC TISSUE CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN HYPERTROPHIED HEARTS INVIVO WITH CARDIAC CYCLE-DEPENDENT VARIATION IN INTEGRATED BACKSCATTER CIRCULATION Masuyama, T., STGOAR, F. G., Tye, T. L., Oppenheim, G., Schnittger, I., Popp, R. L. 1989; 80 (4): 925-934

    Abstract:

    Integrated ultrasonic backscatter (IB) is a noninvasive measure of the acoustic properties of myocardium. Previous experimental studies have indicated that altered acoustic properties of the myocardium are reflected by the magnitude of variation of IB during the cardiac cycle. In our study, cardiac cycle-dependent variation of IB was noninvasively measured using a quantitative IB imaging system in 12 patients with uncomplicated pressure-overload hypertrophy and 13 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Sixteen normal subjects served as a control. The magnitude of cardiac cycle-dependent variation of IB for the posterior wall was 6.0 +/- 0.9 dB in normal subjects, 5.7 +/- 0.8 dB in the patients with uncomplicated pressure-overload hypertrophy, and 6.7 +/- 2.1 dB in the patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There were no significant differences among any of these groups. In contrast, the magnitude of cardiac cycle-dependent variation of IB for the septum was significantly smaller in the patients with uncomplicated pressure-overload hypertrophy (2.8 +/- 1.3 dB) and in the patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (3.1 +/- 2.3 dB) than in normal subjects (4.9 +/- 1.0 dB). The magnitude of cardiac cycle-dependent variation of IB was smaller as the wall-thickness index increased (r = -0.53, p less than 0.01, n = 82 for all data). This IB measure also correlated with percent-systolic thickening of the myocardium (r = 0.67, p less than 0.01, n = 82). Thus, alteration in the magnitude of cardiac cycle-dependent variation of IB was observed in hypertrophic hearts and showed apparent regional myocardial differences.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989AW00100020

    View details for PubMedID 2529060

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