Christian Guilleminault

Publication Details

  • OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP-APNEA SYNDROME OR ABNORMAL UPPER AIRWAY-RESISTANCE DURING SLEEP JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY Stoohs, R., Guilleminault, C. 1990; 7 (1): 83-92

    Abstract:

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is well known by now, but, at both extremes of age, increased upper airway resistance may lead to clinical symptoms without complete apnea. Abnormal craniofacial features appear to be responsible for the very early appearance during childhood of increased upper airway resistance. In adults, snoring, often related to partial upper airway obstruction located in the pharynx, may be associated with changes in respiratory timing and intermittent arousal. Many treatments are currently available to deal with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. It is important to recognize the location(s) of the upper airway obstruction before considering treatment and to evaluate the associated risk factors. Early recognition of factors involved in increased upper airway resistance may allow prevention, a more efficacious approach than treatment of an already developed syndrome.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990CJ50400007

    View details for PubMedID 2406286

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