Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

Publication Details

  • THE HISTOLOGY OF INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SURGICAL PATHOLOGY LYNES, W. L., Flynn, S. D., Shortliffe, L. D., Stamey, T. A. 1990; 14 (10): 969-976

    Abstract:

    Several studies have reported histologic findings in interstitial cystitis (IC) bladder biopsy specimens. However, these studies used a variety of criteria to define IC, which may explain the variation noted in the histologic changes. Clinical experience shows that these biopsy specimens are often not helpful in confirming the diagnosis. Our study was designed to examine the histologic features identified in bladder biopsy specimens from patients with IC and compare them with biopsy specimens from a control population. Although IC patients as a group had a higher incidence and degree of denuded epithelium, ulceration, and submucosal inflammation, none of these findings was pathognomonic. In addition, these findings occurred only in interstitial cystitis patients with pyuria or small bladder capacity. The inflammatory infiltrate seen in IC was composed predominantly of lymphocytes, with increasing numbers of plasma cells as the degree of inflammation increased. There was no specific predilection for the inflammatory infiltrate to be perineural. Submucosal inflammation was associated with denuded epithelium, ulceration, pyuria, and a clinical response to therapy suggesting a pathophysiologic relationship. Epithelial and basement membrane thickness, submucosal edema, vascular ectasia, fibrosis, and detrusor muscle inflammation and fibrosis were not significantly different in the IC and control patients. These findings suggest that IC is a chronic submucosal inflammatory disease, at least in those patients with small bladder capacities or pyuria. IC is best diagnosed from its clinical features; the histologic changes identified in the bladder biopsy play a supportive role in this diagnosis. Mast cells play a limited role in the diagnosis of IC.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990EA36800011

    View details for PubMedID 2403198

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