Bertil Glader

Publication Details

  • INVIVO HEPATIC AND INTESTINAL TOXICITY OF SODIUM CYANATE IN RATS - CYANATE-INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN HEPATIC GLYCOGEN-METABOLISM JOURNAL OF LABORATORY AND CLINICAL MEDICINE Haut, M. J., Toskes, P. P., Hildebrandt, P. K., Glader, B. E., Conrad, M. E. 1975; 85 (1): 140-154

    Abstract:

    To determine the hepatic and intestinal toxicity of sodium cyanate, this compound was administered to rats by orogastric tube (PO) or intraperitoneal injection (IP). At low dosage (50 mg. per kilogram per day PO for 8 weeks), the animals showed no clinical effects other than mild lethargy. They had normal intestinal absorption studies, but demonstrated decreased liver G6PD activity and a slight increase in hepatic glycogen. At higher dose levels (200 mg. per kilogram per day PO for 10 days, 400 mg. per kilogram per day PO for 3 days, and 100 mg. per kilogram per day IP for 10 days), the animals became very lethargic and developed hind-limb paralysis; many animals died during the period of dosing. The severity and rate of onset of symptoms increased proportionally with the dose level. Liver sections from rats receiving these higher doses showed striking increases in glycogen deposition. Activities of hepatic enzymes involved in glycogen synthesis and degradation were measured in rats receiving 200 mg. per kilogram per day PO or 100 mg. per kilogram per day IP. Significant decreases were noted in the activities of glucose-6-phosphatase and G6PD in PO-dosed rats. The activities of phosphorylase, UDPG-pyrophosphorylase, glycogen synthetase, phosphoglucomutase, and debrancher did not differ from control rats. In IP-dosed rats, significant decreases were observed in the activities of glucose-6-phosphatase, G6PD, phosphorylase, and UDPG-pyrophosphorylase, but not in the other glycogen-related enzymes. Our data suggest that sodium cyanate affects several enzymes of hepatic glycogen metabolism but that the enzymes vary in their susceptibility (glucose-6-phosphatase and G6PD greater than phosphorylase and UDPG pyrophosphorylase.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1975V287200017

    View details for PubMedID 237970

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