William J. Maloney, MD

Publication Details

  • THE INFLUENCE OF CONTINUOUS PASSIVE MOTION ON OUTCOME IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATED RESEARCH Maloney, W. J., Schurman, D. J., HANGEN, D., Goodman, S. B., Edworthy, S., Bloch, D. A. 1990: 162-168

    Abstract:

    All primary condylar total knee replacement arthroplasties (TKAs) performed from 1977 to 1984 at the authors' institution were divided into two groups based on the use of continuous passive motion (CPM) in the immediate postoperative period. The control group consisted of 73 patients who were treated with 95 TKAs without postoperative CPM. The average age was 65.4 years. The study group consisted of 38 patients who had 51 TKAs in which CPM was used postoperatively. The mean patient age was 62.8 years. The most common diagnoses in both groups were osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Range of motion (ROM) was recorded preoperatively, at discharge, at three months, one year, two years, and at the last follow-up visit. There were no statistically significant differences in the ROM between the two groups at any of these time periods. At two years, the mean flexion and extension in the study group were 99 degrees and -4 degrees, respectively, compared to 103 degrees and -5 degrees in the control group. The average hospital stay was 11.2 days in the study group, whereas it was 15.1 days in control group. In the control group, there was one superficial infection, no deep infections, and four pulmonary emboli compared with three superficial infections, two deep infections, and no pulmonary emboli in the study group. There was no difference in the transfusion requirements between the two groups. CPM is advocated by the authors to help achieve discharge ROM earlier, but the protocol has been changed to begin CPM on the second postoperative day to allow the wound to stabilize.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990DM91300023

    View details for PubMedID 2364605

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