Maurice L. Druzin

Publication Details

  • Decreased amniotic fluid index in low-risk pregnancy JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE Kreiser, D., El-Sayed, Y. Y., Sorem, K. A., Chitkara, U., Holbrook, R. H., Druzin, M. L. 2001; 46 (8): 743-746

    Abstract:

    To evaluate the perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by isolated decreased amniotic fluid volume (AFI) after 30 weeks' gestation (AFI < or = 5 or > 5 cm but < 2.5th percentile).We retrospectively studied 150 low-risk singleton pregnancies > 30 weeks' gestation with decreased AFI. We also compared the outcomes of 57 pregnancies with AFI < or = 5 cm to those of 93 pregnancies with AFI > 5 cm but < 2.5th percentile (borderline AFI). Pregnancy outcome was assessed with respect to antepartum, intrapartum and neonatal measures. Statistical significance (P < .05) between groups was determined by means of the Student t test and chi 2 analysis.There were no statistically significant differences between pregnancies with AFI < or = 5 cm and those with AFI > 5 cm but < 2.5th percentile with respect to labor induction for an abnormal nonstress test (7.0% vs. 7.5%, overall 7.3%), cesarean sections for fetal heart rate abnormalities (7.0% vs. 7.5%, overall 7.3%), presence of meconium (16.1% vs. 15.7%, overall 16%) and Apgar score < 7 at five minutes (0 vs. 1.1%, overall 0.66%). There were no perinatal deaths in either group. Antepartum variable decelerations were more common in pregnancies with AFI < or = 5 cm as compared to those with AFI > 5 cm but < 2.5th percentile (63.1% vs. 45.1%, P = .007; overall 53.3%).With antepartum monitoring, perinatal outcome in low-risk pregnancies with an isolated decreased AFI after 30 weeks' gestation (< or = 5 or > 5 cm but < 2.5th percentile) appears to be good.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000170694100009

    View details for PubMedID 11547649

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