Ethan Soudry

Publication Details

  • Survival outcomes in acute invasive fungal sinusitis: A systematic review and quantitative synthesis of published evidence. Laryngoscope Turner, J. H., Soudry, E., Nayak, J. V., Hwang, P. H. 2013; 123 (5): 1112-1118

    Abstract:

    Acute invasive fungal sinusitis (AIFS) is an aggressive and often fatal infection. Despite improvements in medical and surgical therapy, survival remains limited and the factors that contribute to patient outcomes remain poorly understood. The current study systematically reviews and quantitatively synthesizes the published literature to characterize prognostic factors associated with survival.Systematic review.Fifty-two studies comprising a total of 807 patients met inclusion criteria and were used for analysis of treatment, presentation, and outcomes. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to identify prognostic factors.All studies were classified as level 4 evidence, as per definitions provided by the Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine. The most common presenting symptoms of patients with AIFS were facial swelling (64.5%), fever (62.9%), and nasal congestion (52.2%). Most patients were treated with a combination of intravenous antifungal medication and surgery. The overall survival rate was 49.7%. On univariate analysis, poor prognosis was associated with renal/liver failure, altered mental status, and intracranial extension. Patients who were diabetic, had surgery, or received liposomal amphotericin B had an improved chance of survival. On multivariate analysis, advanced age and intracranial involvement were identified as independent negative prognostic factors. Positive prognostic factors again included diabetes and surgical resection.The overall mortality of patients with AIFS remains high, with only half of the patients surviving. Diabetic patients appear to have a better overall survival than patients with other comorbidities. Patients who have intracranial involvement, or who do not receive surgery as part of their therapy, have a poor prognosis.N/A.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/lary.23912

    View details for PubMedID 23300010

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