Melissa Hurwitz

Publication Details

  • Impact of Immunosuppression on the Development of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Viremia After Pediatric Liver Transplantation TRANSPLANTATION PROCEEDINGS Lu, B. R., Park, K. T., Hurwitz, M., Cox, K. L., Berquist, W. E. 2013; 45 (1): 301-304

    Abstract:

    Pediatric liver transplant (OLT) patients are at risk of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This study examined the impact of induction and immunosuppression on EBV viremia.A retrospective chart review was performed on 197 pediatric patients and induction regimen, immunosuppression levels, and EBV viremia were documented for 1 year post-OLT. Logistic regression models determined associations between induction, immunosuppression, and EBV.Fifty six percent of patients developed EBV viremia. Incidence of EBV viremia was 73% with antithymocyte globulin (ATG), 63% with daclizumab, and 39% for neither, though the trend was not significant [ATG: odds ratio (OR) 0.19; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.024-1.58; P = .125; daclizumab OR; 1.07; 95% CI 0.270-4.23; P = .925]. Tacrolimus immunosuppression levels were supratherapeutic 28.7% of the time; however, only supratherapeutic tacrolimus levels between 0 and 2 weeks increased EBV viremia at 2 to 4 weeks post-OLT (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.10-2.94; P = .02). Three patients developed PTLD.The use of ATG and daclizumab induction likely does not play a role in the development of EBV viremia. Supratherapeutic tacrolimus levels 0 to 2 weeks post-OLT impact the development of EBV viremia at 2 to 4 weeks. The incidence of PTLD was low, suggesting better EBV and immunosuppression monitoring plays an important role in reducing PTLD.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.transproceed.2012.04.035

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315007200060

    View details for PubMedID 23267800

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