Steven T. Woolson

Publication Details

  • LEG LENGTH EQUALIZATION DURING TOTAL HIP-REPLACEMENT ORTHOPEDICS Woolson, S. T. 1990; 13 (1): 17-21

    Abstract:

    A method of equalization of leg lengths during total hip replacement surgery was developed which utilizes the concept of equalizing the vertical dimensions of the resected femoral head and neck segment and the remaining hip joint cartilage space, which are removed during the procedure, with the vertical dimensions of the femoral and acetabular prostheses, which are implanted into that void. This was accomplished by determining the dimensions of the prostheses from careful preoperative templating technique and by using a simple arithmetic formula to determine the level of the femoral neck osteotomy. The level of the osteotomy was made by a measurement from the top of the dislocated head of the femur to the medial femoral neck calcar. The radiologic postoperative leg length differences of a consecutive series of 84 patients undergoing primary total hip replacement using this method were determined. The average discrepancy was 2.8 mm. Seventy-five patients (89%) were found to have a postoperative leg length discrepancy of 6 mm (1/4 inch) or less. Six patients (7%) had a discrepancy of 7 to 13 mm, and only three patients (4%) had more than 13 mm (1/2 inch) leg length difference. Using this technique only two patients (2.5%) with unilateral hip replacements had leg lengthening of more than 6 mm.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990CK89400002

    View details for PubMedID 2300514

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