Glenn M. Chertow

Publication Details

  • Physical activity and self-reported symptoms of insomnia, restless legs syndrome, and depression: The comprehensive dialysis study HEMODIALYSIS INTERNATIONAL Anand, S., Johansen, K. L., Grimes, B., Kaysen, G. A., Dalrymple, L. S., Kutner, N. G., Chertow, G. M. 2013; 17 (1): 50-58

    Abstract:

    Symptoms of sleep and mood disturbances are common among patients on dialysis and are associated with significant decrements in survival and health-related quality of life. We used data from the Comprehensive Dialysis Study (CDS) to examine the association of self-reported physical activity with self-reported symptoms of insomnia, restless legs syndrome (RLS), and depression in patients new to dialysis. The CDS collected data on physical activity, functional status, and health-related quality of life from 1678 patients on either peritoneal (n = 169) or hemodialysis (n = 1509). The Human Activity Profile was used to measure self-reported physical activity. Symptoms were elicited in the following manner: insomnia using three questions designed to capture difficulty in initiating or maintaining sleep, RLS using three questions based on the National Institutes of Health workshop, and depression using the two-item Patient Health Questionnaire. We obtained data on symptoms of insomnia and depression for 1636, and on symptoms of RLS for 1622 (>98%) patients. Of these, 863 (53%) reported one of three insomnia symptoms as occurring at a persistent frequency. Symptoms of RLS and depression occurred in 477 (29%) and 451 (28%) of patients, respectively. The Adjusted Activity Score of the Human Activity Profile was inversely correlated with all three conditions in models adjusting for demographics, comorbid conditions, and laboratory variables. Sleep and mood disturbances were commonly reported in our large, diverse cohort of patients new to dialysis. Patients who reported lower levels of physical activity were more likely to report symptoms of insomnia, RLS, and depression.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1542-4758.2012.00726.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000313751100007

    View details for PubMedID 22812496

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