Daniel Murphy

Publication Details

  • Midterm Results of the Modified Ross/Konno Procedure in Neonates and Infants ANNALS OF THORACIC SURGERY Maeda, K., Rizal, R. E., Lavrsen, M., Malhotra, S. P., Akram, S. A., Davies, R., Suleman, S., Reinhartz, O., Murphy, D. J., Hanley, F. L., Reddy, V. M. 2012; 94 (1): 156-163

    Abstract:

    The management of congenital aortic stenosis in neonates and infants continues to be a surgical challenge. We have performed the modified Ross-Konno procedure for patients who have severe aortic insufficiency or significant residual stenosis after balloon aortic dilation. The midterm results of this procedure were evaluated in this subset of patients.Between 1994 and 2010, a total of 24 patients younger than 1 year of age underwent the modified Ross-Konno procedure. The diagnoses were aortic stenosis with or without subaortic stenosis (n = 16), Shone's complex (n = 7), and interrupted aortic arch with subaortic stenosis (n = 1). The aortic root was replaced with a pulmonary autograft, and the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) was enlarged with a right ventricular infundibular free wall muscular extension harvested with the autograft.Age at operation ranged from 1 to 236 days (median 28 days). The median follow-up period was 81 months (range 1-173 months). There was 1 early death and no late mortality. Overall the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rate was 95% ± 4.5%. Freedom from aortic stenosis was 94.7% ± 5.1% at 1, 2, and 5 years. Less than mild aortic insufficiency was 93.3% ± 6.4% at 2 years, and 74.7% ± 12.9% at 5 years. In total, 23 reoperations and reinterventions were performed; 14 were allograft conduit replacements. Two patients required aortic valve plasty. None required valve replacement. The reintervention-free rate was 64.6% ± 10.8% at 2 years and 36.9% ± 11.3% at 5 years.Pulmonary autografts demonstrated good durability with low mortality and morbidity. This study shows that the modified Ross-Konno procedure can be a practical choice in selective cases for complex LVOT stenosis in neonates and infants.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2012.03.007

    View details for Web of Science ID 000305801600033

    View details for PubMedID 22626750

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