Michael Amylon

Publication Details

  • TREATMENT OF T-LINEAGE ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA HEMATOLOGY-ONCOLOGY CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Amylon, M. D. 1990; 4 (5): 937-949

    Abstract:

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is an aggressive disease that responds poorly to "standard" therapy designed for the more common B-lineage ALLs in childhood. The principles of this "standard" therapy were derived from empiric clinical trials. Thus, it is not surprising that the therapy that had the greatest impact on survival in the group as a whole would be found to be most successful for the most common subset of patients. T-cell malignant lymphoblasts share many biologic features that set them apart from the more common B-lineage lymphoblasts. Some of these biologic features suggest therapeutic approaches that should be particularly successful in treating patients with T-cell leukemia. The use of aggressive, multiple-agent "pulse" chemotherapy has been shown through empiric trials to have relative efficacy in T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, presumably because of the rapid generation time and high growth fraction. Future studies will (1) determine the optimal dose and schedule of cytosine arabinoside needed to exploit the increased Ara-CTP accumulation in T-cell blasts, (2) determine the efficacy of a new agent, deoxycoformycin, an inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, to exploit the biochemical phenotype of T-cell blasts, and (3) assess the ability of conjugated anti-T monoclonal antibodies to deliver a cytotoxic agent, thus exploiting unique antigenic determinants at the cell surface. As more is learned about the biology of T-cell malignancies, further treatment strategies may be suggested to exploit the new features that are discovered. Similarly, it is hoped that the unique features of the B-lineage leukemias will suggest treatment strategies that will improve survival in those patients as well. Certainly, improved survival has already been achieved in the case of the B-cell leukemias and Burkitt's lymphomas, and improvement may also be possible for the pre-B and early pre-B phenotypes of lymphoblastic leukemia.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990ED91700006

    View details for PubMedID 2262486

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