Alan Yeung, MD

Publication Details

  • Most accurate definition of a high femoral artery puncture: Aiming to better predict retroperitoneal hematoma in percutaneous coronary intervention CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Tremmel, J. A., Tibayan, Y. D., O'Loughlin, A. J., Chan, T., Fearon, W. F., Yeung, A. C., Lee, D. P. 2012; 80 (1): 37-42

    Abstract:

    Retroperitoneal hematoma (RPH) increases morbidity and mortality in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). High femoral arteriotomy is an independent predictor of RPH, but the optimal angiographic criterion for defining a high puncture is unknown.We retrospectively identified 557 consecutive PCI cases with femoral angiograms. Arteriotomy sites were categorized as high based on three angiographic criteria: at or above the proximal third of the femoral head (criterion A), at or above the most inferior border of the inferior epigastric artery (criterion B), and at or above the origin of the inferior epigastric artery (criterion C). Cases of RPH were then identified.Of the 557 PCI patients, 26 had a high femoral arteriotomy by criterion A, 17 by criterion B, and 6 by criterion C. Among these patients with a high arteriotomy, RPH occurred in four with criterion A, in three with criterion B, and in one with criterion C. Of the three criteria, criterion A most strongly correlated with RPH (odds ratio [OR] 96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 10.3-898.4; p < 0.0001) compared with criterion B (OR 58, 95% CI 8.9 to 372.6; p < 0.0001) or C (OR 27, 95% CI 2.6 to 290.1; p = 0.053). All criteria had high specificity (A, 96%; B, 97%; C, 99%), but the sensitivity was higher with criterion A (80%) than criterion B (60%) or C (20%), and statistically, the use of criterion A led to the most accurate risk-stratification for RPH (A, ? = 0.79; B, ? = 0.59; C, ? = 0.19).Among the three common definitions of high arteriotomy, femoral artery puncture at or above the proximal third of the femoral head is the landmark that most accurately risk stratifies PCI patients for development of RPH.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.23175

    View details for Web of Science ID 000305692100005

    View details for PubMedID 22511409

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