Michael Marmor

Publication Details

  • FOVEAL CAVITATION AS AN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY FINDING IN CENTRAL CONE DYSFUNCTION RETINA-THE JOURNAL OF RETINAL AND VITREOUS DISEASES Leng, T., Marmor, M. F., Kellner, U., Thompson, D. A., Renner, A. B., Moore, W., Sowden, J. C. 2012; 32 (7): 1411-1419

    Abstract:

    To describe a distinctive foveal cavitation as seen by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in certain cone dysfunction syndromes.Observational case series. Patients were evaluated by dilated fundus examination, fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, full-field electroretinogram, multifocal electroretinogram, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, color vision testing, fluorescein angiography, Goldmann visual field testing, and molecular genetic analysis.We present eight patients with foveal cavitation in association with presumed cone dysfunction. This was characterized on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography by a gap in the subfoveal outer segment layer without more diffuse retinal thinning. There were 5 patients of age 10 years to 27 years and 3 patients of age 49 years to 52 years, with a 1.5- to 38-year history of bilateral visual loss. A small foveal oval-shaped area of reduced foveal fundus autofluorescence, surrounded by increased fundus autofluorescence, was seen in the younger patients, and a broad circle of increased fundus autofluorescence in the older patients. The multifocal electroretinogram always showed central amplitude reduction, but there were varying degrees of cone dysfunction on full-field electroretinogram. There were mild abnormalities on desaturated color vision testing. The family history was noncontributory in all cases. None of the cases were congenital. ABCA4 gene mutations were identified in three of five patients tested; CNGB3 testing was negative in these patients.Cone dysfunction syndromes typically show retinal thinning on optical coherence tomography imaging, although several case reports have noted focal outer retinal loss. Our case series shows that a distinctive optical coherence tomography finding, foveal cavitation, may be a clue to cone dysfunction syndromes, but is not specific to any one hereditary disorder or age group.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/IAE.0b013e318236e4ea

    View details for Web of Science ID 000305782100025

    View details for PubMedID 22466470

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