David Hovsepian, MD

Publication Details

  • Percutaneous Cholecystostomy for Acute Cholecystitis: Ten-Year Experience JOURNAL OF VASCULAR AND INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY Joseph, T., Unver, K., Hwang, G. L., Rosenberg, J., Sze, D. Y., Hashimi, S., Kothary, N., Louie, J. D., Kuo, W. T., Hofmann, L. V., Hovsepian, D. M. 2012; 23 (1): 83-88

    Abstract:

    To review the clinical course of patients with acute cholecystitis treated by percutaneous cholecystostomy, and to identify risk factors retrospectively that predict outcome.A total of 106 patients diagnosed with acute cholecystitis were treated by percutaneous cholecystostomy during a 10-year period. Seventy-one (67%) presented to the emergency department (ED) specifically for acute cholecystitis, and 35 (23%) were inpatients previously admitted for other conditions. Outcomes of the two groups were compared with respect to severity of illness, leukocytosis, bile culture, liver function tests, imaging features, time intervals from onset of symptoms to medical and percutaneous intervention, and whether surgical cholecystectomy was later performed.Overall, 72 patients (68%) showed an improvement clinically, whereas 34 (32%) showed no improvement or a clinically worsened condition after cholecystostomy. Patients who presented to the ED primarily with acute cholecystitis fared better (84% of patients showed improvement) than inpatients (34% showed improvement; P < .0001). Gallstones were identified in 54% of patients who presented to the ED, whereas acalculous cholecystitis was more commonly diagnosed in inpatients (54%). Patients with sepsis had worse outcomes overall (P < .0001). Bacterial bile cultures were analyzed in 95% of patients and showed positive results in 52%, with no overall effect on outcome. There was no correlation between the time of onset of symptoms until antibiotic therapy or cholecystostomy in either group. Long-term outcomes for both groups were better for those who later underwent cholecystectomy (P < .0001).Outcomes after percutaneous cholecystostomy for acute cholecystitis are better when the disease is primary and not precipitated by concurrent illness.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jvir.2011.09.030

    View details for Web of Science ID 000299151400015

    View details for PubMedID 22133709

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