Jonathan S. Berek

Publication Details

  • PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF ENDOMETRIAL HYPERPLASIA AND CARCINOMA WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Fu, Y. S., Gambone, J. C., Do, Berek, J. S. 1990; 153 (1): 50-61

    Abstract:

    Endometrial cancer is currently the commonest pelvic malignancy affecting American women, most of whom share the same pathophysiologic basis, that is, unopposed estrogenic stimulation. The initial result of hyperestrogenism is the development of endometrial hyperplasia, which is reversible in most cases by appropriate hormonal therapy. Persistent stimulation eventually leads to atypical hyperplasia with nuclear atypia and invasive carcinoma. Because there is no cost-effective screening method for the detection of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma, it is essential to survey the high-risk population with appropriate diagnostic techniques. After diagnosis, therapy should be individualized based on pathologic findings (cell type and histologic grade) and extent of disease (International Federation of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians stage, depth of myometrial invasion, and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node status). Recent studies suggest that sex hormone receptors and nuclear DNA ploidy patterns provide useful prognostic information independent of histologic grade.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990DQ62200007

    View details for PubMedID 2202159

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: