Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

Publication Details

  • Detection of seizure-like movements using a wrist accelerometer EPILEPSY & BEHAVIOR Lockman, J., Fisher, R. S., Olson, D. M. 2011; 20 (4): 638-641

    Abstract:

    Caregivers of people with epilepsy are commonly concerned about unwitnessed seizures causing injury and even death. The goal of this study was to determine if a wrist-worn motion detector could detect tonic-clonic seizures. Individuals admitted for continuous video/EEG monitoring wore a wristwatch-size device that was programmed to detect rhythmic movements such as those that occur during tonic-clonic seizures. When such movement was detected, the device sent a Bluetooth signal to a computer that registered the time and duration of the movements. Recorded detections were compared with the routinely recorded video/EEG data. Six of 40 patients had a total of eight tonic-clonic seizures. Seven of the eight seizures were detected. Nonseizure movements were detected 204 times, with opportunity for canceling transmission by the patient. Only one false detection occurred during sleep. In principle, this device should allow caregivers of people with tonic-clonic seizures to be alerted when a seizure occurs.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.yebeh.2011.01.019

    View details for Web of Science ID 000290056200008

    View details for PubMedID 21450533

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