Alexander Tzabazis

Publication Details

  • Selective nociceptor activation in volunteers by infrared diode laser MOLECULAR PAIN Tzabazis, A. Z., Klukinov, M., Crottaz-Herbette, S., Nemenov, M. I., Angst, M. S., Yeomans, D. C. 2011; 7

    Abstract:

    Two main classes of peripheral sensory neurons contribute to thermal pain sensitivity: the unmyelinated C fibers and thinly myelinated A? fibers. These two fiber types may differentially underlie different clinical pain states and distinctions in the efficacy of analgesic treatments. Methods of differentially testing C and A? thermal pain are widely used in animal experimentation, but these methods are not optimal for human volunteer and patient use. Thus, this project aimed to provide psychophysical and electrophysiological evidence that whether different protocols of infrared diode laser stimulation, which allows for direct activation of nociceptive terminals deep in the skin, could differentially activate A? or C fiber thermonociceptors in volunteers.Short (60 ms), high intensity laser pulses (SP) evoked monomodal "pricking" pain which was not enhanced by topical capsaicin, whereas longer, lower power pulses (LP) evoked monomodal "burning" pain which was enhanced by topical capsaicin. SP also produced cortical evoked EEG potentials consistent with A? mediation, the amplitude of which was directly correlated with pain intensity but was not affected by topical capsaicin. LP also produced a distinct evoked potential pattern the amplitude of which was also correlated with pain intensity, which was enhanced by topical capsaicin, and the latency of which could be used to estimate the conduction velocity of the mediating nociceptive fibers.Psychophysical and electrophysiological data were consistent with the ability of short high intensity infrared laser pulses to selectively produce A? mediated pain and of longer pulses to selectively produce C fiber mediated thermal pain. Thus, the use of these or similar protocols may be useful in developing and testing novel therapeutics based on the differential molecular mechanisms underlying activation of the two fiber types (e.g., TRPV1, TRPV2, etc). In addition, these protocol may be useful in determining the fiber mediation of different clinical pain types which may, in turn be useful in treatment choice.

    View details for DOI 10.1186/1744-8069-7-18

    View details for Web of Science ID 000289115700001

    View details for PubMedID 21426575

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: