Media Coverage

SF Chronicle

06.25.13--Stanford Helps Cancer Patients With Skin Issues
Stanford Hospital and Clinics was highlighted in two stories in the San Francisco Chronicle. One takes an in-depth look at the supportive dermato-onocology clinic at the Stanford Cancer Center. The clinic treats patients with skin-related side effects of cancer treatments, such as rashes and lesions. Dr. Bernice Kwong, Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology, founded the clinic. Dr. Lynn Million, Clinical Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology and Dr. Paul Khavari, SHC Chair of the Dept. of Dermatology and Professor of Dermatology, also comment on the importance of the clinic. Read story here.

NBC

06.25.13--Baby Boomers Urged to Take Hepatitis C Test
Stanford Hospital & Clinics was featured in a story about the recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that baby boomers be tested for Hepatitis C. The decision by the independent organization of medical experts carries a lot of weight for physicians, insurance companies and drug manufacturers. Watch story here.

 

 

SF Chronicle

06.25.13--Stanford Helps Cancer Patients With Skin Issues
Stanford Hospital and Clinics was highlighted in two stories in the San Francisco Chronicle. One takes an in-depth look at the supportive dermato-onocology clinic at the Stanford Cancer Center. The clinic treats patients with skin-related side effects of cancer treatments, such as rashes and lesions. Dr. Bernice Kwong, Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology, founded the clinic. Dr. Lynn Million, Clinical Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology and Dr. Paul Khavari, SHC Chair of the Dept. of Dermatology and Professor of Dermatology, also comment on the importance of the clinic. Read story here.

NBC

06.25.13--Baby Boomers Urged to Take Hepatitis C Test
Stanford Hospital & Clinics was featured in a story about the recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that baby boomers be tested for Hepatitis C. The decision by the independent organization of medical experts carries a lot of weight for physicians, insurance companies and drug manufacturers. Watch story here.

SV Business Journal

06.20.13--Genome Monopoly Ruling: Who Wins and Loses in Silicon Valley?
The Supreme Court ruling that human genes cannot be patented could open the door to potential advances in medical research and genetic testing. The Silicon Valley Business Journal takes a look at who stands to gain from the high court's decision. Dr. Euan Ashley, Director, Stanford Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease and SoM assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine, comments on how the ruling will affect companies researching genomic sequencing. Read story here.

SF Gate

06.20.13--Not just a smokerís disease ó Former NFL Player Raises Awareness
for Lung Cancer

Stanford Alum and NFL player Chris Draft raises awareness for lung cancer during a visit to the Stanford Cancer Center. Peninsula Press article featured in the SFGate.com 'In the Peninsula' blog. The story takes a look at the alarming number of lung cancer patients who are former smokers or never smoked at all. Whitney Greene, service line administrator for the SHC oncology department, comments on Draft's visit and its significance. Read story here.

KGO-TV

06.20.13--Stanford Researchers Use 3D Printers to Model Patients' Organs
In the KGO TV broadcast, Dr. Paul Wang, SHC Director, Cardiac Arrhythmia Service and SoM Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine, comments on how the technology is a game changer, allowing doctors to test different surgical strategies before the patient gets into the OR. Stanford postdoctoral research fellow Jeff Caves also describes how the models are formed. Watch here.

Delta Sky

06.12.13--Delta Sky Magazine: Cancerís Big Questions
This year, more than a half million Americans will die of cancer. Delta Sky Magazine takes an in-depth look at the most debated questions about cancer when it comes to prevention and treatment. Dr. Jafi Lipson, radiologist with the Stanford Cancer Center, comments on radiation risk of 3-D mammography. Read story here.

San Francisco Chronicle

06.04.13--Sleep Monitors Make Waking Easier
The article takes a look at a variety of devices/apps on the market that monitor your sleep and wake you up gently. Dr. Clete Kushida, director of the Stanford Sleep Medicine Center, comments on why people feel better waking up from the lightest stages of sleep. He also offers tips on getting a good night's rest. Read story here.

CBS

06.03.13--Actor Michael Douglas' Throat Cancer Throws Spotlight on HPV
Published reports say Douglas contracted HPV through oral sex. HPV is generally known for causing cervical cancer. However, Dr. John Sunwoo, otolaryngology at SHC, comments on how oral cancer from HPV is on the rise among younger people, and could eventually exceed the incidences of cervical cancer. This interview was repurposed from last year. Watch here.

Stanford Daily

05.23.13--Robots to Join Hospital Staff
Two germ-fighting robots add another layer of protection for patients at Stanford Hospital.  The Xenex robots emit ultraviolet light to destroy bacteria and viruses in hospital rooms. Read story here.

SJ Mercury News

05.16.13--Angelina Jolie's Double Mastectomy Comforts Other Women Who
Make Same Dramatic Choice

Angelina Jolie's double mastectomy comforts other women in similar situation and puts added focus on genetic testing.  Dr. Allison Kurian, oncologist for Stanford Cancer Center, comments on how going public helps other women, and the elevated risks for women born with the BRCA1 mutation. Read story here.

NBC

05.16.13--Bay Area Doctors Counsel Women Facing Genetic Markers
News of Angelina Jolie's double mastectomy brings added attention to the breast cancer gene and option of mastectomy.  Dr. Allison Kurian, oncologist for the Stanford Cancer Center and assistant professor of medicine, comments on the risk of breast cancer related to BRCA1, genetic testing and the option of a mastectomy. Watch here.

SF Chronicle

05.15.13--Robots Disinfect Stanford Hospital Rooms
Frost and Dazzler are vicious, killer robots, and when powered on, they aren't safe to be in the same room with humans. And they've already arrived at a Bay Area hospital. The robots are part of a new trend in high-tech cleaning that uses ultraviolet light to disinfect. Last month, Stanford Hospital began using them to kill microorganisms with pulses of UV light that irreparably damage cells. Read story here.

AIS Health

05.13.13--Emergency Rooms Present Special Risks for Hospital Privacy
The traditional open design of an ER can put a patient's health information at risk. Overcrowding can further raise the risk of a privacy breach.  Dr. Robert Norris, Chief of Emergency Medicine Division, discusses how Stanford's new ER will have new safeguards for protecting patients, including private rooms and a state-of-the-art security system. Read story here.

SF Chronicle

05.12.13--Ultrasound Parties: Wombs with a View
Theater-style ultrasounds, device for smartphones and tablets turn once-private procedure into social event, complete with Facebook. Read story here.

NBC

05.08.13--New Dermatology Center Opens at Stanford
Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy can find new resources at Stanford--a new clinic has opened to treat skin problems associated with cancer treatment. Patients can receive expert dermatological care in tandem with their treatment. Watch story here.

SF Chronicle

05.08.13--E-cigarettes' Dangers Uncertain
There are a lot of public health questions surrounding the use of e-cigarettes, but one thing is not in question - they are becoming a popular alternative to tobacco cigarettes. One in 5 smokers in the United States had tried e-cigarettes in 2011 - up from 1 in 10 in 2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read story here.

NBC

04.30.13--Meet "Frost," Stanford's Infection-fighting Robot
It turns out that answering 12 simple yes or no questions can give you a decent idea of whether you're going to be alive in 10 years, at least if you're older than 50. Read story here.

NBC

04.26.13--Stanford Nurse Doodles, Draws Out Smiles
When the nurses at Stanford consolidated the patient information they keep on a white board, it left behind a large, blank space. It also created an opportunity for Alicia Moreci to make people smile. She dry-erase-marked her first drawing, a Loch Ness Monster, last July. Since then she has completed fifty doodles, each one it seems, brightening the days of her coworkers and patients. Read story here.

San Francisco Chronicle

04.24.13--Prescription Drugs Take-back

Faced with a growing prescription drug abuse problem in the United States, lawmakers and authorities nationwide have sought to improve both regulation and monitoring of the drugs available, and how they're prescribed. They also have taken a simpler step: encouraging people to clean out their medicine cabinets. Read story here.

SF Gate

04.16.13--Don't Fear Warnings About Breast Tissue
Stanford Hospital & Clinics physicians recently put together a public service announcement covering the passage of SB1538--a new law requiring mammographers to notify patients of dense breast tissue--and what it means for patients all over California. Read story here.

San Francisco Chronicle

04.16.13--Stanford Clears Path to Brain Research
New research at Stanford allows doctors to see brain more clearly. Read story here.

Wall Street Journal

04.15.13--Doctor's Orders: 20 Minutes of Meditation, Twice a Day
Researchers are exploring the benefits of meditation on everything from heart disease to obesity. Read story here.

Silicon Valley Business Journal

03.29.13--Dr. Mark Blumenkranz Says Seeing is Believing
Mark Blumenkranz, MD, chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at Stanford University Byers Eye Institute, on the eye-care research hive at Stanford and how it is attacking blindness and vision problems. Read story here.

SF Gate

03.26.13--Aspirin in Daily Dose Not for Everyone
Regular doses of aspirin lower the risks of heart attacks, strokes, and colon, breast and prostate cancer, and now, possibly even melanoma in women, say Stanford researchers in new research this month--but daily dosage is not for everyone. Read story here.

Silicon Valley Business Journal

03.29.13--Dr. Mark Blumenkranz Says Seeing is Believing
Mark Blumenkranz, MD, chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at Stanford University Byers Eye Institute, on the eye-care research hive at Stanford and how it is attacking blindness and vision problems. Read story here.

SF Gate

03.26.13--Aspirin in Daily Dose Not for Everyone
Regular doses of aspirin lower the risks of heart attacks, strokes, and colon, breast and prostate cancer, and now, possibly even melanoma in women, say Stanford researchers in new research this month--but daily dosage is not for everyone. Read story here.

Gary Verwer on USA Today

03.25.13--VIDEO (USA Today): Tiny Heart Repair Tools Replace Surgeon's Knife
Having a heart problem? There's a good chance it can be fixed non-surgically. For Gary Verwer, a new procedure was able to repair his heart without major incisions. Watch story here.

Boston.com

03.24.13--Heart Repair Breakthroughs Replace Surgeon's Knife
Catheters now being used for surgery that once required major incisions. Read story here.

SF Gate

03.20.13--Twelve-item Index Predicts Odds of Dying
It turns out that answering 12 simple yes or no questions can give you a decent idea of whether you're going to be alive in 10 years, at least if you're older than 50. Read story here.

SF Gate

03.12.13--New Surgery an Option for Rare Throat Disorder
Marjorie McFadden was healthy and lively until she began having difficulty swallowing. A new procedure has restored the 90-year-old's ability to eat and drink again. Read story here.

SF Gate

03.08.13--Seniors Use Computers to Challenge Minds
Having a heart problem? There's a good chance it can be fixed non-surgically. For Gary Verwer, a new procedure was able to repair his heart without major incisions. Read story here.

SF Gate

11.20.12--Stanford Analyzes Athletes' Concussions
A partnership between Stanford researchers and football players may lead to new techniques for treating concussions. Read story here.

SF Gate

11.19.12--Guidelines Recommend Routine HIV Testing
A new initiative is works to make HIV/AIDS testing as routine as a cholesterol check. Read story here.

NBC Bay Area

10.25.12--Hormone Therapy May Help Alzheimer's
NBC Bay Area interviews Victor Henderson, MD, about hormone replacement therapy and a recent study suggesting HRT may help offset the development of Alzheimer's in women. Watch story here.

NBC Bay Area

10.20.12--An Alzheimer's Diagnosis in Your 50's
NBC Bay Area discusses the connection between exercise and the progression of Alzheimer's. Watch story here.

CBS 5

10.18.12--HealthWatch: Stanford Offering Free Oral Cancer Screening
On Saturday, physicians will provide free screenings from 8 AM to Noon at Stanford’s Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic at 801 Welch Road in Palo Alto. CBS 5 discusses the event with John Sunwoo, MD, a head and neck surgeon at Stanford. Watch story here.

KGO

10.17.12--NFL Will Soon Measure Hits With Sensors
The NFL has been cracking down on helmet to helmet contact and is committing major resources to study the long-term impact. We could see the San Francisco 49ers using helmets with sensors or mouth guards with sensors next year, KGO reports. Watch story here.

CBS 5

10.17.12--Jefferson Award Winning Sisters Embody Benefits of Organ Donation
"For their service to the cystic fibrosis and transplant communities, and for inspiring others to celebrate life to the fullest, this week’s Jefferson Award in the Bay Area goes to Ana Stenzel and Isa Stenzel Byrnes," writes CBS 5.
Watch story here.

 

 

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