Stanford Fertility and Reproductive Medicine Center  

Clinical Trials and Research

The Center for Research on Women’s Health and Reproductive Medicine is currently conducting the following clinical research studies in reproductive medicine:

Eeva: The Early Embryo Viability Assessment Test

The MultiCenter Registry with Eeva™ (MERGE) Research Study is currently recruiting patients at Stanford Fertility & Reproductive Medicine Center.

Eeva: The Early Embryo Viability Assessment Test, is a test to be used by IVF laboratories to analyze early embryo development and to aid in the selection of the best embryo for transfer.  At the heart of Eeva is software that was designed to assess critical differences in early embryo growth and determine an embryo’s viability and the potential for further development.

The Eeva Test was developed based on landmark research conducted at Stanford University1 which discovered that early embryo growth events can predict embryo development and reflect the underlying health of the embryo. 

Auxogyn Inc. recently completed a multi-center clinical trial using Eeva with 54 patients and 758 embryos. The results from the trial supported that when embryologists used Eeva in conjunction with their traditional techniques they were able to correctly identify non-viable embryos 86% of the time vs. only 58% of the time without using Eeva2.

The goal of the MERGE study is to record and evaluate the use of traditional embryo grading techniques combined with Eeva in the treatment of in vitro fertilization.

If you are interested in participating in this research study, please contact Stanford Fertility & Reproductive Medicine Center,  Mariluz Suarez, MS, MaSuarez@stanfordmed.org for more information.

Eeva is an Investigational device.  Limited by United States law to investigational use.

  1. Wong et al. in Nature Biotechnology, 2010.
  2. Conaghan et al.  Fertility &Sterility, May 2013

Research Study:  In Vitro Activation of Ovarian Follicles: A Clinical Study (IVA)

For patients with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (Premature Ovarian Failure), there is no effective treatment for their infertility using their own eggs.

This study uses an experimental procedure to attempt to stimulate egg production in the ovarian tissue of women who are not producing eggs on their own.

Participants undergo a laparoscopic procedure in which some of their ovarian tissue is removed.  The tissue is treated with growth factors in the laboratory and then surgically reimplanted into the pelvic area.  The participant then undergoes a cycle of in vitro fertilization (IVF).

The study is currently not funded, so the cost of all treatment must be covered by the participant.

This experimental treatment is currently enrolling a limited number of participants at Stanford until additional analysis is completed.

Study Director:
Valerie Baker, MD
REI Division
Department of OB/GYN

For more information, call:
650-724-6850

For general information about participants rights, contact 1-866-680-2906.


Fragile X Research Study

Are you interested in furthering the investigation of Fragile X Syndrome?

Did you know that approximately 20% of women who carry the Fragile X permutation develop a low egg supply before the age of 40? Stanford University Medical Center researchers are gathering information about women who are known Fragile X intermediate or premutation carriers to 1) examine the stability of FMR-1 gene and 2) evaluate changes in egg supply in women who are FMR-1 intermediate or permutation carriers.

You may be eligible to volunteer if you:

If you participate, you would need to:

You will receive:

How long will this take?

Study Director and Researcher: 
Valerie Baker, MD 
REI Division 
Department of OB/GYN

Researcher:
Stephanie Gustin, MD
REI Division
Department of OB/GYN

For more information, please contact: 
Stephanie Gustin, MD 
sfisher@stanford.edu
For general information about participant rights, contact 1-866-680-2906.


Are you interested in helping to improve the understanding of tests for egg supply? 

Roche Diagnostics and Stanford University Medical Center researchers have collaborated to determine the correlation between ultrasound appearance of the ovaries and Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH), a substance measured by a blood test.
You may be eligible to volunteer if you:

If you participate, you would need to:

You will receive:

How long will this take?

Study Director and Researcher: 
Valerie Baker, MD 
REI Division 
Department of OB/GYN

For more information, please contact: 
Oshra Sedan, PhD CCRC
Study Coordinator
osedan@stanford.edu

For general information about participant rights, contact 1-866-680-2906.


Are You Interested in Learning about the Impact of Endometrial Receptivity on Your Fertility?

Here’s your opportunity to participate in an important clinical research study investigating the incidence of a non-receptive endometrium in an infertile population and the effect of maternal weight on endometrial receptivity.

Infertility is a complex medical condition that involves multiple factors. A standard infertility evaluation involves blood work for hormonal analysis, a uterine cavity evaluation and a semen analysis. This, however, does not include patient specific testing examining the role of the endometrium in her infertility. By participating in this study, you will undergo a standard infertility evaluation and receive additional information regarding the receptivity of your endometrium as a possible explanation for your infertility.

You May Be Eligible If You:

StudyParticipation Involves:

Enrolled participants will receive the ERA testing free of charge.

For more information, please contact: 
Dr. Ioanna Comstock
(650) 498-7911
icomstoc@stanford.edu

For general information about participant rights, contact 1-866-680-2906.

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